Win a free copy of MyFaces 1.2 Web Application Development

This week my book, MyFaces 1.2 Web Application Development, is featured in the JavaRanch Book Promotion. That means I’ll be answering questions in the JSF forum of JavaRanch’s Big Moose Saloon the whole week. Everyone who asks a question in that forum from today until Friday, March 26th 2010 has a chance to win one of four free copies of the MyFaces 1.2 Web Application Development book. Some interesting questions have been asked already; I hope to answer many more the next few days…

Published today: Apache MyFaces 1.2 Web Application Development

Today my book, Apache MyFaces 1.2 Web Application Development, is published! Of course this is a big event for me, after working on it for nearly 1.5 years. The book can be ordered from the website of Packt Publishing and will be available trough the major (online) book stores shortly.

Should you have any questions or comments about the book, don’t hesitate to leave a comment here, drop me a line, or use one of the forms on the Packt website for questions or feedback. If you’re interested publishing a review of the book on your website or in a magazine, please contact Swati Iyer, who is responsible for the marketing of the book. Links to resources for the book can be found on the book resources page on this site.

New skin for Trinidad

Apache MyFaces Trinidad is a widely used JSF component set. It is featured in the upcoming book on Apache MyFaces, written by me. The benefits of Trinidad include a large choice of components, built-in Ajax and extensive skinning possibilities. Until now, one of the shortcomings of Trinidad has been the lack of a good looking open source skin. The default skin is called ‘minimal’, and that name does reflect the look of that skin very well. Continue reading

New book on Apache MyFaces coming up!

For over a year I have been working on a book about the Apache MyFaces project for Packt Publishing. The book is nearing completion and is expected to be released February 2010.

The book will be covering the Tomahawk, Trinidad, Orchestra and Extensions Validator subprojects of MyFaces. Throughout the book, Facelets will be used as view technology. That makes the book not only an essential resource for developers that use MyFaces, but also an excellent source of Facelets examples.

You can find more information about the contents of the book at the information page over on the Packt Publishing website. You can also pre order the book via this website.

Oracle ADF: set focus to input field in data table

At my current client we had the first user acceptance test of a new Oracle ADF application. We have a lot of data entry pages in our application, where database records are presented in editable tables. Each table has a tool bar, with a “Create new record” button on it. One of the things the users noticed during the test, is that when they created a new record, the new record showed up in the table and was selected, but the first input field in the record didn’t have the input focus. I looked for a setting in ADF to set the input focus after creating a new record, but didn’t find anything. So I created my own solution… Continue reading

Revisited: Oracle ADF and Virtual Private Database

At the end of my previous post, I stated:

There’s one more thing I’m not really sure of (yet). In section 39.7 of their Fusion Middleware Developer’s Guide, Oracle shows a (in my opinion rather hacky) way to make sure Session information is saved between different incarnations of the ApplicationModule. I’m not sure if this is needed in our approach, since we set the year at the start of each JSF lifecycle anyway. But I implemented it, “just in case”, it doesn’t harm anyone.

After my post, the discussion on the Oracle Forum continued. Continue reading

Oracle ADF and Virtual Private Database

As you probably know, Oracle ADF is a complete JEE application development framework from Oracle. It is targetted at companies that already have an Oracle Database and perhaps legacy applications developed with Oracle’s “Forms” technology. The client I’m working for at the moment is such a company, and we’re developing an application in ADF that is going to replace (a part of) their Forms application eventually. Continue reading

Apache MyFaces Extensions Validator introduced

In a typical Java EE web application, there’s almost always the problem of where to put the validation. Of course there’s only one place where validation belongs: in the model. So if you’re e.g. using EJB as persistence layer, the EJB Entities is where the validation code belongs. However, from a usability point of view, one never wants to leave all validation out of the UI code. This often leads to duplicate validation code. While not ideal, duplicate validation code is often considered as inevitable. Continue reading

RegEx testers compared

Regular Expressions are a very powerful tool for developers. They can be used for various jobs. A common use is for validation of user input agains a pattern. This can be done in code (using a method from the java.util.regex package) or e.g. with a JSF validator component (either home brew or ready made). Another use for regular expressions is doing advanced search-and-replace operations on (e.g.) source code. Most IDEs and the more advanced text editors offer search-and-replace based on regular expressions. Continue reading