Weird shell script problem + solution

Yesterday, I installed a fresh Java EE application server to run a test on an application I was working on. The installation of the application server was as simple as unzipping a distribution archive. As with most application servers, the server could be started by running a shell script from the command line. This was all familiar to me, as I already had another instance of the same server installed on my MacBook. However, when I tried to run the script, I got surprised by an error message: Continue reading

Developing Java software on a Mac: file management

For a developer, file management is an essential task. More than the average computer user, the location and name of a file matters to a developer. Often, (sets of) files have to be copied, either on the local machine or to or from a network share. Sometimes the command line is very fast and efficient for file management tasks. However, as directory structures get more complex, I prefer a visual file management tool, as it gives me a better overview of the structure. Continue reading

Developing Java software on a Mac: command line

As a developer, I have to use the command line every now and then. In fact, that was one of the reasons for me to chose a MacBook Pro over a Windows machine. Even on the most recent versions of Windows, the command line application still uses some MS-DOS-derived command shell. Admitted, they implemented auto-completion, but it’s still a pretty limited environment. Mac OS X on the other hand is a Unix-based operating system. Hence the Mac OS X Terminal has the same super powers as many other Unix and Linux command lines. Continue reading