Developing Java software on a Mac: command line

As a developer, I have to use the command line every now and then. In fact, that was one of the reasons for me to chose a MacBook Pro over a Windows machine. Even on the most recent versions of Windows, the command line application still uses some MS-DOS-derived command shell. Admitted, they implemented auto-completion, but it’s still a pretty limited environment. Mac OS X on the other hand is a Unix-based operating system. Hence the Mac OS X Terminal has the same super powers as many other Unix and Linux command lines. Continue reading

Developing Java software on a Mac: copy & paste

I recently got a new job and my new employer gave me the opportunity to chose a MacBook Pro as my development machine. I already had pretty good experiences with my iMac at home, so I didn’t have to think very long about this choice.

However, after years of developing Java software on Windows and Ubuntu boxes, I had to adapt some habits, reprogram my muscle memory and find some new tools. The good news is of course that nearly all Java software runs smoothly on a Mac. For the major Java IDEs, special Mac installers are available, doing a great job to integrate with the Mac OS X platform. After a few weeks of working on the Mac, I have also found some pretty nice additional tools that make the life of a (Java) software developer a lot easier. This is the first of a series of articles dedicated to (Java) software development on a Mac. Continue reading

Back from Vienna

I returned from Vienna yesterday evening. After the CONFESS_2011 conference, I enjoyed the city for two days before heading home. I’ve just unpacked my stuff, so now I have the time to post my slides online at Slideshare. The source code of the demos is already online at my Google Code project. (You can just download the MeetingRooms folder from the trunk, that contains the state of the project as it was at the end of my presentation.)

If you attended my talk in Vienna, I hope you enjoyed it and that I’ve convinced you to start using ExtVal in your Java EE projects.

ExtVal talk @ CONFESS this Wednesday

I will be giving an interesting talk this Wednesday at the CONFESS conference in Vienna, Austria. I will be talking about ExtVal and how it can help us to prevent repetitive validation code in Java EE 5 as well as Java EE 6 applications. Of course, the talk will contain many interesting demos. And… I’ll give away some free ebooks during my talk!

CONFESS starts tomorrow. There are a lot of very interesting talks about Java EE and JSF. I’m looking forward to meeting many JSF enthusiasts!

J-Fall session resources online now

The resources of the session I did today at J-Fall 2010 are online now!

  • You can view the presentation slides at SlideShare.
  • The sources of my demo are available as a NetBeans project on my Google code project. (Just checkout trunk/MeetingRooms.)

The winners of the ebooks I gave away will be contacted by Packt Publishing once their book is ready for download. (Please drop me a line if you don’t hear anything from them.)

I think it was a good session this morning. At least the audience was nice. I got some good questions and we had a nice discussion afterwards. I hope everyone enjoyed the session.

Coming up: ExtVal session @ J-Fall conference

I’ll be speaking about MyFaces ExtVal at next week’s J-Fall conference in Nijkerk, The Netherlands. J-Fall is the most important Java conference in The Netherlands, organized by the Dutch Java User Group, NLJUG. As always, the J-Fall program is packed with interesting talks, including some by internationally recognized speakers. The J-Fall is a one-day conference, this year at Wednesday, November 3rd. Continue reading

Repair a corrupt JDeveloper

It happened to me two times over the last couple of months. In the morning, when I fired up JDeveloper (11.1.1.3.0) to work on the ADF project at my current client, JDeveloper suddenly “forgot” which project workspaces were open and lots of other settings were lost. Apparently, some settings files are corrupted for whatever reason. In this state, it is not possible to do my normal work with JDeveloper. As I don’t want to spend half the day with re-installing JDeveloper and all plugins and re-doing all my settings, I figured out a way to “repair” the JDeveloper settings. I thought I’d share this, so if you ever encounter a similar situation, you can safe yourself a lot of work by just repeating what I did. Continue reading

Packt launches new brands

Packt Publishing, the publisher of my book, just launched two new brands: Packt Enterprise and Packt Open Source. In its first years, Packt specialized in books on open source software products. Over the past years, more and more books about commercial Enterprise software were published by them. To remain focussed, Packt decided to introduce two different brands under the Packt umbrella. I think focussing is always a good idea. On the other hand, there isn’t always a sharp line between Enterprise and Open Source. So it’s interesting to see which choices are going to be made in the future.

To celebrate the launch, Packt offers a 20% discount on all its hard copy books until May 3rd, 2010. An even larger discount is given on ebooks: 30%. Of course this is an excellent chance to buy the Apache MyFaces 1.2 Web Application Development book on a bargain!

New ExtVal release

Last week, a new version of Apache MyFaces Extenstions Validator (ExtVal) was released. ExtVal is a validation framework that allows us to keep our (JSF) View layer free of any validation code and instead put our validation rules as annotations in the Model layer of our application. These annotations can either be JPA annotations, ExtVal annotations or JSR 303 (Bean Validation) annotations. Even a combination of different types of annotations is possible. JSR 303 support is added to ExtVal since last weeks release. Continue reading